Sol Beck

Grammar summary unit 2

 

Past Simple

To talk about things that happened in the past but in chronological order.

  • When she opened the door, she pretended that we weren’t there and she went to her room.

Or to talk about past habits or past states.

  • We often went to the bar for a drink before dinner.
  • He really liked sport, and was very fit.

 

Past Continuous

To set the scene in a story.

  • Last night I was walking home and listening to my ipod when…

Or to talk about actions in progress that happened in the past or longer actions interrupted by shorter actions.

  • When she opened the door, we were talking about her.

 

Past Perfect Simple

To talk about events which happened before the main event.

Earlier single events

To talk about events and experiences that happened earlier, or single actions that were completed earlier in the past.

  • When she opened the door, he had already left.

We use past perfect simple (not continuous) to say how much or how many we had done of something that happened earlier in the past.

  • We had driven 500 miles and we needed some rest.

Duration from earlier in the past (stative verbs)

To talk about states/situtations that had started earlier in the past.

  • The day Anne died, they had been married for 48 years.

 

Past Perfect Continuous

Duration from earlier in the past (dynamic verbs)

To talk about longer continuous actions which started earlier in the past than the main events of the story.

  • I was very angry. I had been waiting for him in the cold, and he didn’t call to say he’d be late.

Repeated actions from earlier in the past (dynamic verbs)

To talk about repeated actions from earlier in the past.

  • I couldn’t believe it. She had been writing a letter every day for over a year.

 

Used to + Infinitive

Repeated actions in the past

To talk about things that we did (repeatedly) in the past.

  • When I was a child, I used to go skiing every Winter.

Situations or states that are no longer true

To talk about situations/states (stative verbs) that were true in the past, but are no longer true.

  • As a child I used to be blond.

Used to, didn’t use to, did you use to

The negative of used to + infinitive: didn’t use to

Questions: did you use to…?

There isn’t a present form of used to.

 

Be used to

To talk about something you are used to do or to doing something you are accustomed to do.

 

Get used to

To talk about when you get used to something or to doing something you become accustomed to do.

Used to + Infinitive, be/get used to + ing

  • The past verb used to is always followed by infinitive.
  • The word to is part of the infinitive.
Fecha: 11/6/2018 | Creado por: Sol
Categoria: BHKP
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